Etherten and PoE Regulator 802.3AF

The EtherTen combines an Uno-equivalent Arduino-compatible board and Wiznet-based Ethernet support, along with a microSD card slot and Power-over-Ethernet support. [Product page]
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harryman01
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Etherten and PoE Regulator 802.3AF

Post by harryman01 » Tue Jul 03, 2012 1:00 pm

I would like to know if is possible to power a small step motor using the Etherten and the PoE Regulator 802.3AF, if this is possible, the question is how to?

any help, will be welcome

Thanks

cef
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Re: Etherten and PoE Regulator 802.3AF

Post by cef » Wed Jul 04, 2012 4:42 am

Do you have a specific stepper motor in mind?

The big issue will be how much current (and to a lesser extent, voltage) you need to drive the motor. it will also depend on what circuitry you're using to drive the stepper motor.

I can't seem to find any details on how much current one of those 802.3af regulators provide.

Note: If you power your device off the 7.5V side, there is a good side (more volts = more power) vs a down side (if you 'brown out' the 7.5 volts by drawing too much current, your EtherTen may lose power or reset.

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jonoxer
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Re: Etherten and PoE Regulator 802.3AF

Post by jonoxer » Thu Jul 05, 2012 1:21 am

The PoE regulator should be able to supply (in theory!) a maximum of about 15W from the regulated side, so 2A at 7.5V. That's dependent on thermal load though: it's switchmode, but it does still get warm. To really push it hard (pulling 15W continuously out of it) you'd probably want to make sure there's good airflow over the regulator module. Many of the pins on the module are actually "thermal ground" pins, which transfer heat to the yellow carrier PCB to give it a bit more thermal mass and dissipation ability. The PCB itself isn't particularly big though.

Short answer: probably up to 2A, but make sure it doesn't overheat.
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Jon

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